Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the category: technology
Apr
3

Popgadget Personal Technology for Women

Products | Thunderbolt Technology Community

Abaco Systems, Inc.*


Adapter/Expansion

Windows

Ableconn Technologies*


Adapter/Expansion

Ableconn Technologies*


Adapter/Expansion

ACASIS Inc. Co., Ltd.*


Dock

ACASIS Inc. Co., Ltd.*


Cable

Accusys*


Storage

Accusys*


Storage

Accusys*


Cable

Acer*


Notebook/Computer

Windows

Acer*


Notebook/Computer

Windows

Acer*


Notebook/Computer

Windows

Acer*


Notebook/Computer

Windows

Acer*


Notebook/Computer

Windows

Acer*


Notebook/Computer

Windows

Acer*


Notebook/Computer

Windows

ACON, Advanced-Connectek Inc.*


Cable

Action Star Technology*


Storage, Other

Action Star Technology*


Adapter/Expansion, Dock

Adaptertek Technology Co., Ltd*


Dock

AJA Video Systems*


Audio/Video

AJA Video Systems*


Audio/Video

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Cable

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Cable

Akitio, an OWC brand*


eGFX

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Adapter/Expansion

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Adapter/Expansion

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Storage

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Adapter/Expansion

Akitio, an OWC brand*


eGFX

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Adapter/Expansion

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Adapter/Expansion, Cable

Windows

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Adapter/Expansion

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Dock

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Storage

Windows

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Adapter/Expansion

Windows

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Storage

Windows

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Storage

Windows

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Storage

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Storage

Akitio, an OWC brand*


Dock, Storage

ALOGIC*


Adapter/Expansion

ALOGIC*


Adapter/Expansion

ALOGIC*


Dock

Alta Data Technologies*


Other

Windows

Apple*


Notebook/Computer

Apple*


Notebook/Computer

Apple*


Notebook/Computer

Apple*


Notebook/Computer

Apple*


Cable

Apple*


Adapter/Expansion, Cable

Archgon International Ltd.*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Adapter/Expansion

Areca Technology*


Adapter/Expansion

Areca Technology*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Storage

Areca Technology*


Storage

ASRock*


Add-in-Card

Windows

ASRock*


Motherboard

Windows

ASRock*


Motherboard

Windows

ASUS*


eGFX

Apr
2

H+ME Technology | The Future of Homebuilding, Today.

It’s not just a house.

It’s a H+ME.


Imagine an entirely new approach to
homebuilding – where every system and
component within the structure is designed
to perform in perfect harmony with the
others. Where all of the framing is
manufactured to the most stringent
specifications in a single, state-of-the-art
plant. And where every step of your home’s
construction, and everything used in its
construction, is precisely planned,
produced, measured, tested and
accounted for.

PLAY THE VIDEO TO DISCOVER MORE

Better,
by design.

Adapted from technology first developed in Germany and Sweden, the H+ME approach applies thoroughly modern solutions to traditional construction challenges.

DESIGN: READ MORE

The science
of building.

Automated. Integrated. Dedicated. Our 200,000 square foot manufacturing facility puts complete production of all H+ME Technology building materials under one roof.

MANUFACTURING: READ MORE

Built better here, too.

Precision production inside our dedicated plant, means more precise construction on the jobsite.
EXECUTION: READ MORE

A home
with a future.

Energy efficiency and environmental responsibility aren’t just add-ons for H+ME Technology; they’re designed into every home we build right from the very start.

INVESTMENT: READ MORE

The ultimate benefit:
peace of mind.

Discover the benefits of owning a home built with H+ME Technology

BENEFITS: READ MORE

Source Article

Apr
2

4 Arguments Against Technology

kkelly.JPG

I believe we have a moral obligation to increase the power and presence of technology in the world, but not everyone believes that — to put it mildly. Many believe the opposite: that we have a moral obligation to reduce the power and presence of technology. I want to fully understand those arguments so I am collecting them in order to confront them as well as I can. I am interested in valid reasons to diminish technology, but also in mythical reasons as well. Things people believe about the technium which may not be true, but motivate them. Here is my first cut. Please comment on alternative reasons I missed.

I think there are four basic arguments against technology, with many sub-reasons. In summary: Technology should be reduced as much as possible because it is contrary to nature, and/or to humanity, and/or to technology itself and finally, because it is a type of evil and thus is contrary to God.

Contrary to Nature. Technology is in opposition to nature. It is produced at the expense of nature because it destroys ecological habitats. Its steel is mined from the earth; its lumber is taken by cutting down forests; its rare metals dug from the ground; its plastics sucked from oil and then burned into the air. Its factories pave over wetlands or meadows. Worse this destruction of natural habitat can extinguish species, an act which cannot be undone (at least not yet). Even if technology halted the destruction of natural habitat, the fact that we consume large amounts of energy causes a disruption in the atmosphere, which alters the climate. The scale of technology is simply so large that almost no matter how environmentally benign it may seem, its sheer size overwhelms natural cycles.

Contrary to Humans. Technology erodes human character. It separates us from nature, which diminishes our natural self. Out of touch with nature, we behave selfishly, stupidly. We become consumers instead of receivers. We become artificial. At the extreme we behave like machines. Technology makes us greedy, unhappy, impatient, insensitive and full of hubris.

Contrary to Technology Itself. Technology proceeds so fast it is going to self-destruct. It is no longer regulated by nature, or humans, and cannot control itself. Self-replicating technologies such as robotics, nanotech, genetic engineering are self-accelerating at such a rate that they can veer off in unexpected, unmanageable directions at any moment. The Fermi Paradox suggests that none, or very few civilizations, escape the self-destroying capacity of technology.

Contrary to God. Technology has all the hallmarks of an evil force. The worst injuries to ourselves and our species come at the hand of technology: atomic bombs, guns everywhere, toxins in water, mind drugs, dams that fail, marketplace bombs, persistent radiation, automobile crashes, not to mention the technologies of war — tanks, predator drones, land mines, etc — which have been designed with only ONE purpose: to kill as many humans as possible. Technologies amplify violence, and this violence is systemic, part of the agenda,

Apr
2

A science and technology timeline

Date Invention or discovery Articles on Explain that stuff Prehistory

4–5 billion years ago

Sun starts to produce energy.

Solar cells
Energy

10 million years ago. Humans make the first tools from stone, wood,
antlers, and bones. Tools and machines

1–2 million years ago

Humans discover fire.

Biofuels
Candles
Car engines
Jet engines

25,000– 50,000 BCE Humans first wear clothes. Biomimetic clothing 10,000 BCE Earliest boats are constructed. Ships and boats 8000– 9000 BCE Beginnings of human settlements and agriculture. Biofuels
Water 6000– 7000 BCE Hand-made bricks first used for construction in the Middle East. Brick (ceramics) Ancient times 4000 BCE Iron used for the first time in decorative ornaments. Iron and steel 3500– 5000 BCE Glass is made by people for the first time. Glass 3500 BCE Humans invent the wheel. Tools and machines
Wheels and axles 3000 BCE First written languages are developed by the Sumerian people of southern Mesopotamia (part of modern Iraq). Digital pens
Typewriters ~2500 BCE Ancient Egyptians produce papyrus, a crude early version of paper. Paper 3000– 600BCE Bronze Age: Widespread use of copper and its important alloy bronze. Copper
Alloys
Metals 2000 BCE Water-raising and irrigation devices like the shaduf (shadoof), invented
by the Ancient Egyptians, introduce the idea of lifting things using counterweights. Elevators
Tools and machines
Water c1700 BCE Semites of the Mediterranean develop the
alphabet. Digital pens 1000 BCE Iron Age begins: iron is widely used for making tools and weapons in many parts of the world. Iron and steel

600 BCE

Thales of Miletus discovers static electricity.

Electricity

Static electricity

500BCE– 900CE Nazca people of Peru are believed to have experimented with balloon flight. Hot-air balloons 400BCE– 300BCE Chinese experiment with flying kites. Airplanes

~250 BCE

Ancient Egyptians invent lighthouses, including the huge Lighthouse of Alexandria.

Fresnel lenses

~300– 200 BCE

Chinese invent early magnetic direction finders.

Compasses

~250 BCE

Archimedes invents the screw pump for moving water and other materials.

Tools and machines c.150– 100 BCE Gear-driven, precision clockwork machines (such as the Antikythera mechanism) are in existence. Clockwork c.50 BCE Roman engineer Vitruvius perfects the modern, vertical water wheel. Turbines

62 CE

Hero of Alexandria, a Greek scientist, pioneers steam power.

Steam engines

105 CE

Ts’ai Lun makes the first paper in China.

Paper

27 BCE–395 CE Romans develop the first, basic concrete called
pozzolana. Steel and concrete Middle Ages ~600 CE Windmills are invented in the Middle East. Wind turbines 700–900 CE Chinese invent gunpowder and fireworks. Bullets
Fireworks
Space rockets 800–1300 CE Thanks to inventors such as the Banū Mūsā brothers
and al-Jazari, the Islamic “Golden Age” sees the development of a wide range
of technologies, including ingenious clocks and feedback mechanisms
that are the ancestors of modern automated factory machines. Clockwork
Cams and cranks
Robots 1000 CE ?? Chinese develop eyeglasses by fixing lenses to
frames that fit onto people’s faces. Lenses 1206 Arabic engineer al-Jazari invents a flushing hand-washing machine, one
of the ancestors of the modern toilet. Toilets 1232 CE Chinese repel
Apr
2

Technology in the Classroom in 2019: 6 Pros & Cons

Technology in education is the biggest change in teaching we will ever see. For years, policy makers, teachers, parents and students alike have been weighing the potential benefits of technology in education against its risks and consequences. But now the debate is more pressing than ever, as curricula increasingly incorporate technology and professors experiment with new teaching methods. On one hand, technology allows you to experiment in pedagogy, democratize the classroom and better engage students. On the other hand, some argue technology in the classroom can be distracting and even foster cheating.

Free Ebook

Turn class technology distractions into opportunities to connect with your students.

Find out how in our free handbook, Reaching Today’s Distracted Students

Download →

What does it mean to use technology in the classroom?

Students are digital natives. They’ve grown up with technology; it’s woven into their lives. In fact, it’s one of the basic 21st century skills that they’ll need in school and the workplace. But using computer technology in the classroom isn’t just about digital devices in class — it relates to anything that facilitates an interaction between teacher and student. Classroom engagement is at an all-time low and lecturers are competing against countless diversions from phones, tablets and laptops. Technology in schools could be seen as the culprit, or it could be harnessed to improve student engagement and effectiveness.

“Digital education is generating new learning opportunities as students engage in online, digital environments and as faculty change educational practices through the use of hybrid courses, personalized instruction, new collaboration models and a wide array of innovative, engaging learning strategies.

Furthermore, a 21st century view of learner success requires students to not only be thoughtful consumers of digital content, but effective and collaborative creators of digital media, demonstrating competencies and communicating ideas through dynamic storytelling, data visualization and content curation.”

David Goodrum, director of academic technology and information services, Oregon State University, in Campus Technology

With that in mind, this article looks at the pros and cons of using technology in the classroom as well as the cons—and it addresses how to combat some of the pitfalls you might come across when adopting new technology-based teaching and assessment techniques.

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The pros:

1. Using technology in the classroom allows you to experiment more in pedagogy and get instant feedback.

Technology allows for more active learning; you can increase engagement through online polling or asking quiz questions during lectures (with instantaneous results). Subject matter is dynamic and timely with digital textbooks that embed links to relevant materials or student-maintained course wikis. Whether adding a single tool for a specific project or term, or making a more dramatic change such as a flipped classroom,, being well-versed in technology can help build credibility with students, and even fellow colleagues. Should you choose to integrate technology into your classroom, you will have a better idea of your students’ progress.

2. Technology

Apr
2

Computers in Libraries 2020 – The Library Technology and Innovation Conference

Computers in Libraries 2020 has been Postponed! See our Announcement for more information.

The World’s Leading Library Technology and Innovation Conference

Generation Next: Preparing for New Technologies

Computers in Libraries provides a unique, annual opportunity for library and information professionals from all over the world to gather together and discuss the myriad of ways technology continues to impact libraries and the people who use them. Join more than 1,000 of your peers to learn, share, and celebrate the technologies and people that are shaping the future of libraries.

At Computers in Libraries you’ll hear the innovative approaches that the world’s leading libraries are deploying in all types of settings. The next generation of technology and people, Generation Next, will be ushering in new and exciting perspectives, strategies, programs, communities and more in the coming years. From management and funding tips, to serious evaluation of emerging technology and internet revolutions, to furthering our search and organization skills, to creating new positions of influence, this event has it all! No matter what your job role, or what type of library or organization, you’ll find that all of the bases are covered at Computers in Libraries.

You can expect to leave Computers in Libraries with new friends and professional allies and actionable advice and tactics for moving your organization forward. Join us in March in Arlington, VA for this career- and organization-changing opportunity.

Computers in Libraries 2020 offers more networking opportunities than ever before. Register today and get access to these special events!

Source Article

Apr
2

National Center for Appropriate Technology

LIHEAP

LIHEAP

The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) assists eligible low-income households with their heating and cooling energy costs, bill payment assistance, energy crisis assistance, weatherization and energy-related home repairs. Learn more.

Save Energy

Save Energy

For more than 32 years NCAT’s energy team has helped implement energy conservation and efficiency improvements that result in cost savings while directly impacting climate change. Our specialists have expertise in commercial, residential, and farm energy. Visit our Energy Page.

Donate

Donate to NCAT

NCAT works to promote healthy communities, protect our natural resources and reduce poverty. Your gift will help leave a cleaner, more viable world to the next generation. Please consider making a donation.

Montana healthy food and communities initiative

Montana Healthy Food & Communities Initiative

Our Montana Healthy Food and Communities Initiative (MHFCI) encompasses three projects that work together to bring healthy, local foods to people across the state: the FoodCorps program, the Farm to Cafeteria Network, and the Grow Montana Food Policy Coalition. Learn more.

Mississippi food justice

Mississippi Food Justice

The groups that make up the Collaborative include the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT), FoodCorps, Mileston Cooperative Association, Mississippi Farm to School Network, and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. The project is funded by a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF). Visit this website to learn more.

Energy Corps

Energy Corps

The Energy Corps was created to address unmet community energy needs by promoting sustainable energy consumption and education, fostering community sustainability and helping to mitigate the effects of global climate change. Serving as an Energy Corps member provides a unique opportunity to help others while gaining new skills and experiences. Visit the Energy Corps page.

armed to farm

Armed to Farm

Armed to Farm is Sustainable Agriculture Training for Military Veterans. NCAT has been involved in targeted veteran outreach and assistance since 2010. NCAT agriculture specialists have hosted and been involved in at least 17 veteran focused trainings, reaching over 800 veterans across the US. Learn more.

Source Article

Apr
2

Use of Technology in Teaching and Learning

Technology ushers in fundamental structural changes that can be integral to achieving significant improvements in productivity. Used to support both teaching and learning, technology infuses classrooms with digital learning tools, such as computers and hand held devices; expands course offerings, experiences, and learning materials; supports learning 24 hours a day, 7 days a week; builds 21st century skills; increases student engagement and motivation; and accelerates learning. Technology also has the power to transform teaching by ushering in a new model of connected teaching. This model links teachers to their students and to professional content, resources, and systems to help them improve their own instruction and personalize learning.

Online learning opportunities and the use of open educational resources and other technologies can increase educational productivity by accelerating the rate of learning; reducing costs associated with instructional materials or program delivery; and better utilizing teacher time.

Disclaimer The links on this page are provided for users convenience and are not an endorsement. See full disclaimer. 

Virtual or online learning: 48 states and the District of Columbia currently support online learning opportunities that range from supplementing classroom instruction on an occasional basis to enrolling students in full-time programs. These opportunities include dual enrollment, credit recovery, and summer school programs, and can make courses such as Advanced Placement and honors, or remediation classes available to students. Both core subjects and electives can be taken online, many supported by online learning materials. While some online schools or programs are homegrown, many others contract with private providers or other states to provide online learning opportunities.

Full-time online schools: The following online or virtual schools enroll students on a full-time basis. Students enrolled in these schools are not attending a bricks and mortar school; instead they receive all of their instruction and earn all of their credits through the online school.

State operated 

  • The Florida Virtual School – An online school that provides full-time learning opportunities to students in grades K-12. Districts can also work with Florida Virtual School to provide blended learning opportunities to students by enabling them to access online courses from school sites. Additional link here.
  • Utah Electronic High School – An 18-year-old online high school providing a range of courses to students year round. The school can award diplomas to students who are home-schooled, have dropped out, or are ineligible to graduate from a traditional high school for specific reasons.
  • North Carolina Virtual Public School – An online high school offering 120 courses to students both during and after the school day. The courses offered include Advanced Placement and honors courses, world languages, electives, credit recovery, and online college courses. The school also provides test preparation and career planning services to students.

District operated

  • Karval Online Education – A public K-12 online school for Colorado residents that provides a free computer for the family to use while the student is enrolled and provides reimbursement opportunities to offset Internet and other educational expenses. Dual credit courses are available to juniors and seniors.
  • Campbell County