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Archive of posts published in the category: computer
Apr
7

New and Refurbished Computers by Computer Renaissance

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New Computers
New Computer SalesAt Computer Renaissance, you’ll find a complete selection of new computers to fit every situation. Choose from preconfigured systems, or let our staff help you build your new computer from the ground up. All of our computers are manufactured to the highest quality standards, using only name brand components. We can help you find the right computer to meet your individual needs. Call Computer Renaissance at 1-888-COMPREN, or find a location near you.

Refurbished Computers
Refurbished Computer SalesOur reconditioned computers are among the highest quality available. All of our refurbished machines must pass a multi-point inspection to ensure that only top-rated computers ever make it to the sales floor. Returned to factory specifications, our recertified computers are the smart choice for those looking for an economical alternative to the high cost of the mass manufactured computers. For more details, call Computer Renaissance at 1-888-COMPREN, or find a location near you.

Computer Repair
Computer RepairComputer Renaissance is your source for complete computer repair. Whether your hard drive needs to be replaced or your power supply has failed, Computer Renaissance can do it all. With service available in shop and at your home or business, Computer Renaissance has the tools to get the job done right. And with our quick turn-around, you won’t have to wait weeks to get your computer back. Call Computer Renaissance at 1-888-COMPREN, or find a location near you.

Computer Upgrades
Computer UpgradeWant to bring your computer into the new millennium? Computer Renaissance can help! With upgrades for video cards, hard drives, memory, and more, Computer Renaissance offers name-brand components at affordable prices. Upgrading your computer has never been easier! Our staff can help you choose the right parts to make your computer perform the way you want it to. For more details, call Computer Renaissance at 1-888-COMPREN, or find a location near you.

Data Recovery
Hard Drive RecoveryYour data is important. We know that. Computer Renaissance has the tools to help you get your data back and offer solutions to ensure that your data is securely backed up. From hard drives to flash drives, Computer Renaissance has the ability to recover data from almost any media. And with multiple options available, we’ll find the right processes that present the best chances for a successful recovery. Call Computer Renaissance at 1-888-COMPREN, or find a location near you.

Virus & Spyware Removal
Virus Removal
Threats to your data security are out there. Viruses and malware are present in every corner of the internet. Computer Renaissance utilizes the newest technology to combat dangerous attacks from these rogue programs. Our technicians have the tools to scan your systems to ensure

Apr
7

55 Interesting Facts About Computer You May Not Know

There are a whole lot of interesting computer facts that are still dug down deep inside. However, for the present situation, we still have a good number of interesting facts about a computer that you probably did not know before.

In general, you can also consider these as one of the most interesting facts about technology (not exactly computer facts). Though we have come far ahead and now have a variety of good computers or good laptop brands still, numerous fun facts about computers do exist. Unfortunately, the facts that amuse you aren’t necessarily the truth.

So, we bring you a filtered list of the most interesting computer facts that you probably did not know before.

 The History of Computers

Charles Babbage in 1833 invented all the parts that are now used for the modern computer. But the first ‘modern’ computer was invented only 120 years later.

The Z1 was the first fully operational digital computer developed by Konrad Zuse in 1936. In 1939, he created the Z2 as the first electro-mechanical computer in the world. While Charles Babbage is being considered as the “father of the computer”, Zuse can be considered as the inventor of the “modern computer”.

The first hard drives available were even bigger than a commercial fridge – another computer facts by which you will get amazed.

Alan Turing is the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence. In addition, the “Turing Machine” which is a mathematical model of computation was invented by him.

Alan Turing

The first disk drive to use removable media was the IBM 1311. You may not believe, but as you can see in the image below, it resembles the look of a washing machine. It was quite big, yet it had a storage capacity of fewer than 5 megabytes.

  • IBM 1311Disk Drive

Ada Lovelace (of course, a lovely lady!), an English mathematician and a writer, is considered as the first computer programmer. She is known for her work on the “Analytical Engine” (Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer). Her notes on the engine served as the first algorithm to be carried out by a machine.

Interesting Computer Facts

With the standard QWERTY keyboard, the longest word one can write is “Typewriter”.

Douglas Engelbart introduced the first computer mouse to the world. It is now one of the most necessary computer peripheral. To our surprise, the body (or the base) was made of wood with metal wheels supporting to roll back and forth. Only it had a cord connected to it, which was interpreted as the tail of a mouse (the small cute rodent). Hence, it was termed as the “Mouse” for a computer.

Douglas Engelbart

A normal human being blinks around 20 times a minute. But, when compared to a computer user, they blink just 7 times a minute on an average. Simply, we tend to concentrate more on the screen, so we usually blink a lot less in front of a computer than we do normally.

Microsoft’s project to develop a new operating system

Apr
6

What is computer? – Definition from WhatIs.com

A computer is a device that accepts information (in the form of digitalized data) and manipulates it for some result based on a program, software, or sequence of instructions on how the data is to be processed.

Complex computers include the means for storing data (including the program, which is also a form of data) for some necessary duration. A program may be invariable and built into the computer hardware (and called logic circuitry as it is on microprocessors) or different programs may be provided to the computer (loaded into its storage and then started by an administrator or user). Today’s computers have both kinds of programming.

Major types of computers

Analog computer – represents data by measurable quantities
Desktop computer – a personal computer that fits on a desk and is often used for business or gaming
Digital computer – operates with numbers expressed as digits
Hybrid computer – combines features of both analog and digital computers
Laptop (notebook) – an easily transported computer that is smaller than a briefcase
Mainframe (big iron) computer – a centralized computer used for large scale computing
Microcomputer – generally referred to as a PC (personal computer). Uses a single integrated semiconductor chip microprocessor.
Minicomputer – an antiquated term for a computer that is smaller than a mainframe and larger than a microcomputer
Netbook – a smaller and less powerful version of a laptop
Personal computer (PC) – a digital computer designed to be used by one person at a time
Smartphone – a cellular telephone designed with an integrated computer
Supercomputer – a high performing computer that operates at extremely high speeds
Tablet computer (tablet PC) – a wireless personal computer with a touch screen
Workstation – equipment designed for a single user to complete a specialized technical/scientific task

History of the modern computer

Most histories of the modern computer begin with the Analytical Engine envisioned by Charles Babbage following the mathematical ideas of George Boole, the mathematician who first stated the principles of logic inherent in today’s digital computer. Babbage’s assistant and collaborator, Ada Lovelace, is said to have introduced the ideas of program loops and subroutines and is sometimes considered the first programmer. Apart from mechanical calculators, the first really useable computers began with the vacuum tube, accelerated with the invention of the transistor, which then became embedded in large numbers in integrated circuits, ultimately making possible the relatively low-cost personal computer.

Modern computers inherently follow the ideas of the stored program laid out by John von Neumann in 1945. Essentially, the program is read by the computer one instruction at a time, an operation is performed, and the computer then reads the next instruction.

From the mid-1900s to the present, the advancement of computers is divided into five generations. While the year span for each generation varies depending on the reference source, the most recognized generational timeline is below.

1940 to 1956

First generation computers were room-sized machines that used vacuum tubes for circuitry and magnetic drums for limited

Apr
6

What is a Computer? – Definition from Techopedia

The earliest digital electronic device that could be defined as the first modern computer is the Colossus. Built in 1943-44, the Colossus was devised to crack the Lorenz SZ 40/42, a German encryption machine used to support military communications during World War II.

The device used 2,400 vacuum tubes to perform multiple boolean logical operations to decode encrypted data.

Modern computers come in all shapes and sizes to perform a broad range of different functions. Although the first ones that come to mind are desktop and laptop computers, many other less-assuming devices — such as grocery scanners, ATMs, and smart TVs — are computers as well.

The diffusion of smartphones, game consoles, wearables, and smart appliances made computers much more readily available in our daily life.

A computer is made up of multiple parts and components that facilitate user functionality.

A computer has two primary categories:

Hardware

Physical structure that houses a computer’s processor, memory, storage, communication ports and peripheral devices. Each of these components (called devices) have a different purpose, which may be either accepting inputs, storing data or sending outputs.

For example, a mouse and a microphone are input devices used to record user activities and transform them into data that is transmitted to the system unit. A hard disk is a storage unit where data is stored and accessed by other devices.

A monitor or a speaker are output devices that transform processed data into (respectively) video and audio signals.

Usually, the core components that represent the bare minimum that allow a computer to function are:

Processor (CPU)

The component that processes and executes inputs received from hardware and software.

Motherboard

A mainboard that provides basic connection between all the other hardware components and devices (internal and external).

Memory (RAM)

A temporary data storage space that stores the information the CPU is actively using.

Storage device

A storage device where data is stored on a permanent basis. It’s slower but less volatile than the RAM.

Power supply unit

That’s pretty self-explanatory: without power, no electronic device can work!

Software

All parts of a computer that are not strictly physical, such as data, programs, applications, protocols, etc., are broadly defined as “software.” Although software has no material form, it is no less critical to receive information, encode, store and process it.

Computer software includes all executable and non-executable data, such as documents, digital media, libraries, and online information. A computer’s operating system (OS) and all its applications are software as well.

A computer works with software programs that are sent to its underlying hardware architecture for reading, interpretation and execution.

Computers are classified according to computing power, capacity, size, mobility and other factors, as personal computers (PC), desktop computers, laptop computers, minicomputers, handheld computers and devices, mainframes or supercomputers.

Source Article

Apr
6

Definition of Computer at Dictionary.com

[ kuh m-pyoo-ter ]

/ kəmˈpyu tər /


noun

a programmable electronic device designed to accept data, perform prescribed mathematical and logical operations at high speed, and display the results of these operations. Mainframes, desktop and laptop computers, tablets, and smartphones are some of the different types of computers.Compare analog computer, digital computer.

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transliterate

Origin of computer

1640–50; compute + -er1; compare Middle French computeur

OTHER WORDS FROM computer

com·put·er·like, adjectivenon·com·put·er, adjective

Words nearby computer

computational complexity, computational fluid dynamics, computational linguistics, compute, computed tomography, computer, computer age, computer animation, computer architecture, computer conferencing, computer crime

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for computer

British Dictionary definitions for computer

computer


noun

  1. a device, usually electronic, that processes data according to a set of instructions. The digital computer stores data in discrete units and performs arithmetical and logical operations at very high speed. The analog computer has no memory and is slower than the digital computer but has a continuous rather than a discrete input. The hybrid computer combines some of the advantages of digital and analog computersSee also digital computer, analog computer, hybrid computer
  2. (as modifier)computer technology Related prefix: cyber-

a person who computes or calculates

Collins English Dictionary – Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Scientific definitions for computer

computer


A programmable machine that performs high-speed processing of numbers, as well as of text, graphics, symbols, and sound. All computers contain a central processing unit that interprets and executes instructions; input devices, such as a keyboard and a mouse, through which data and commands enter the computer; memory that enables the computer to store programs and data; and output devices, such as printers and display screens, that show the results after the computer has processed data.

The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Cultural definitions for

Apr
5

WinDrivers Computer Tech Support Forums


Welcome to the WinDrivers Computer Tech Support Forums.



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Apr
5

Computer Security Act of 1987

Computer Security Act of 1987

In 1987, the U.S. Congress, led by Rep. Jack Brooks, enacted a law reaffirming that the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST), a division of the Department of Commerce, was responsible for the security of unclassified, non-military government computer systems. Under the law, the role of the National Security Agency (NSA) was limited to providing technical assistance in the civilian security realm. Congress rightly felt that it was inappropriate for a military intelligence agency to have control over the dissemination of unclassified information.

The law was enacted after President Reagan issued the controversial National Security Decision Directive (NSDD) 145 in 1984. The Reagan directive gave NSA control over all government computer systems containing “sensitive but unclassified” information. This was followed by a second directive issued by National Security Advisor John Poindexter that extended NSA authority over non-government computer systems.

Since the enactment of the Computer Security Act, the NSA has sought to undercut NIST’s authority. In 1989, NSA signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) which purported to transfer back to NSA the authority given to NIST. The MOU created a NIST/NSA technical working group that developed the controversial Clipper Chip and Digital Signature Standard. The NSA has also worked in other ways to weaken the mandate of the CSA. In 1994, President Clinton issued Presidential Decision Directive (PDD) 29. This directive created the Security Policy Board, which has recommended that all computer security functions for the government be merged under NSA control. In 2009, President Obama released the Administration’s Cyberspace Policy Review. The report placed civil liberties and privacy protections at the center of the Administration’s new approach to guarding the nation’s digital infrastructure. Recognizing that privacy and security are complementary values, President Obama stressed privacy protections in every aspect of the new initiative. The Administration created a new National Security Council cybersecurity team that includes a privacy and civil liberties officer.


  • Public Law 100-235, The Computer Security Act of 1987.
  • U.S. House of Representatives, Science, Space, and Technology Committee Report on the Computer Security Act.
  • Memorandum from Clinton Brooks, Special Assistant to the Director, NSA, on NSDD-145 and the CSA (scanned image of document obtained by EPIC under FOIA) — “In 1984 NSA engineered a National Security Decision Directive, NSDD-145, through the Reagan Administration that gave responsibility for the security of all U.S. information systems to the Director of NSA, removing [the National Bureau of Standards, now NIST] from this.”
  • Controversial 1989 Memorandum of Understanding between NSA and NIST that attempted to give NSA power over civilian computer security.
  • Congressional testimony of EPIC Director Marc Rotenberg on implications of NSA/ NIST Memorandum of Understanding.
  • Computer System Security and Privacy Board (CSSPB) Web site. Congress established the CSSPAB as a public advisory board in the Computer Security Act.
  • Text of Presidential Decision Directive 29, creating the Security Policy Board (SPB). Scanned image of the first page of the directive obtained by EPIC.
  • Internal memorandum detailing activities of the SPB, obtained by the Federation of
Apr
5

Computer Color Matters

(Revised, 2016)

Four versions of a surfer on a wave

These images represent a range of what any given image may look like to someone viewing this web page today. Although it’s exaggerated, it does show how an image that looks good on one computer might look completely different on another. The image at the far left is true to the real colors, the second one from the left represents a very limited color palette (due to the computer’s color capabilities or the wrong file format), the third from the left is a much lighter version of the first one, and the last image on the right represents a very bad color distortion caused by a very old monitor.

Does true color matter?

Consider this: If you visit a clothing store on the Web and see a blue shirt, you are out of luck if you think that the shirt is really that shade of blue. Also, if you’re visiting a museum on the Web to view Matisse’s paintings, or researching skin diseases, or analyzing a satellite weather photo, you may not be seeing the correct colors and you may be getting incorrect information.

The following components work together to create color on your computer:

1. The computer hardware on the motherboard
In the simplest terms, deep inside your computer is a “brain.” It may or may not be able to see and recreate accurate colors.

2. Graphic cards or video cards/boards
You may have a graphic card or video card/board installed. If so, this helps your computer to see better colors and more colors. (Note: This is built into all Macintosh computers.)

3. Your monitor
There are several factors that may cause color distortions:

Old monitors can be burning out. For example, the mechanics that generate the color green may be weakening.

Cheap monitors deliver terrible color. You get what you pay for.  A monitor that costs less than $100 (US), may have poor color accuracy.

Anti-glare screens lower the radiant emissions and this affects the colors generated on your monitor. Colors will appear darker than the actual color and you may see a grey haze over the whole monitor screen (similar to how colors appear when wearing sunglasses). A better solution is placing your monitor away from glare sources. This will give you better color and optimum visual conditions. Regarding electromagnetic field emissions, it is represented that good monitors are properly shielded and that emissions are restrained to the sides and back. The validity of these reports is subject to further questioning.

Therefore, the monitor can be the major cause of good or bad color … or the monitor can be part of the combination of several components that creates good or bad color. In other words, if you have a good video card, good operating system software, and good application software, a bad monitor can still create inaccurate colors. And even if you have a fantastic monitor, the other components can still create bad colors. So you’re looking at a case-by-case

Apr
5

Introduction to Computer Simulation Methods

The third edition of our text, Introduction to Computer Simulation Methods by Harvey Gould, Jan Tobochnik, and Wolfgang Christian, published by Addison-Wesley in 2006, is out of print and will no longer be published by Pearson. PDF copies of the chapters are available from ComPADRE. View the supplemental documents attached to this resource. We will update the chapters soon to fix some of the typos and errors.

The text discusses many novel applications, is accessible to a wide range of readers, develops good programming habits, and encourages student experimentation. Our goal is to teach
students enough tools so that they can use computer simulations as a method of
discovery in physics. The text also introduces Java programming by example in the context of learning physics, but can be used with other programming languages.

ISBN: 0-8053-7758-1 ISBN: 0-8053-7759-X

The computer simulation textbook is complemented by the Open Source Physics Users Guide.

See reviews by Stephen Weppner, “Computational methods with depth and flair,” Computing in Science and Engineering 10 (5) 5-8 (2008) , and Eric Ayars, Am. J. Phys. 74 (7), 652-653 (2006).

Please send suggestions and comments to Harvey Gould, Jan
Tobochnik
, or Wolfgang Christian.

Much of the material at this site has been developed with support by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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