Technology

Tag Archives

Archive of posts published in the category: Britannica
Mar
31

Computer program | Britannica

Computer program, detailed plan or procedure for solving a problem with a computer; more specifically, an unambiguous, ordered sequence of computational instructions necessary to achieve such a solution. The distinction between computer programs and equipment is often made by referring to the former as software and the latter as hardware.

Read More default image

Read More on This Topic

numerical analysis: Computer software

Software to implement common numerical analysis procedures must be reliable, accurate, and efficient. Moreover, it must be written so as…

Programs stored in the memory of a computer enable the computer to perform a variety of tasks in sequence or even intermittently. The idea of an internally stored program was introduced in the late 1940s by the Hungarian-born mathematician John von Neumann. The first digital computer designed with internal programming capacity was the EDVAC (acronym for Electronic Discrete Variable Automatic Computer), constructed in 1949.

A program is prepared by first

Read More
Mar
31

Technology and Invention – Kids | Britannica Kids

Iron, Coal, and Steam

Early in the 1700s two English inventors set the stage for the Industrial Revolution. This was a period of great growth of industry. Abraham Darby discovered that a coke-burning furnace produced good iron. Coke is a form of coal. Thomas Newcomen invented a pump that kept coal mines from filling with water. A steam engine powered the pump.

With these developments, coal and iron production expanded rapidly. Iron remained the main metal for building and toolmaking until the late 1800s. At that time steel (a mixture of iron and carbon) began to replace regular iron.

Meanwhile, in the late 1700s steam began to replace wind and water as the major source of power. In a steam engine, burning coal heated water. The boiling water produced the steam that ran the engine.

Machines and Factories

Other inventions also sped up the production of goods—especially textiles, or cloth.

Read More